Exchanges: From Facebook to Face-to-Face

by Virginia Palmer- Fuechsel Münster While preparing for one of our school’s first international exchange trips, I thought a lot about the nature of communication and friendship in today’s world wide web. Social networks are bringing more people together than ever. The internet is flooded with personal photos, memes, videos, news, gossip, games, covers, profiles, and Read more…

Engaging Students in Meaningful Dialogue

by Alan Villarreal I usually teach junior high English and history, but every year or two I like to step out of my comfort zone by teaching a high school class. I enjoy the high schoolers’ maturity and ability to deal with adult-level material, although they can sometimes be harder to win over, at least Read more…

A Personal Meditation on Oppression in Schools Yesterday and Today

by John Potter For the full decade of the 1950s my elementary and secondary education took place in Cornwall, in southwest England, a remote and economically depressed region. I felt oppressed from beginning to end. I was not a happy camper. The majority of my classmates were sons and daughters of farmers and farmworkers and Read more…

What is Educational Ownership?

by John Potter Typically, when students enter The New School, they have had few, if any, conversations about what it means to take charge of one’s education. They understand “education,” they understand “ownership,” but educational ownership? How do you own something as intangible as education? In these United States, where homeownership, car ownership – the Read more…

Moby Dick: “Then” and “Now”

One of the more striking discrepancies that I have encountered in the classroom caught me by surprise this quarter. It seems that my larger perspective on life is conflicting with the less complex perspective of my students…hard differences to resolve. Here’s the conundrum: Herman Melville’s Moby Dick (1851).  I have taught this class before, and Read more…

What Exactly IS a Liberal Arts Education?

By John Potter and Steve Roushakes       We describe The New School as a unique liberal arts education, but I sometimes wonder how people interpret the term “liberal arts” and subsequently envision our school. The term certainly does not mean an art-focused education, and we are not, then, an art school (though it’s true we have a Read more…